Israel leads the way in researching Autism and Cannabis

Israel and cannabis studies

PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM ARE IN LINE FOR A NEW TRIAL OF TREATING AUTISM SYMPTOMS WITH CANNABIS EXTRACTS

120 Autistic children and young adults are now involved in clinical cannabinoid research in Jerusalem’s Shaare Zedek Medical Center. The study was made easily possible by Israel’s Health Ministry’s progressive approach to researching the benefits of treating its patients with cannabis.

With a full waiting list of parents who have read or heard about the potential benefits of using cannabinoids in autistic children, Dr. Adi Aran is leading the initiative as the director of the hospital’s neuropediatric unit. Initially, when children were administered cannabis extracts for the treatment of epilepsy, positive results were shown in 70 of the patients that exhibited autistic symptoms. This opened the door for research to potentially use cannabis as an alternative to treat children with autism, rather than using powerful antipsychotic medications – which often have short-term results, yet yield harmful short and long-term side effects.

Dr. Adi Aran, director of the neuropediatric unit at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, March 2, 2017. (Luke Tress/Times of Israel)

Dr. Adi Aran, director of the neuropediatric unit at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, March 2, 2017. (Luke Tress/Times of Israel)

Although families worldwide would reach out to their medical professionals regarding treating autism symptoms with cannabinoids, they are met with resistance due to the medical community’s lack of satisfaction of evidence that cannabis can be safe and effective.

The Israeli government has been a leader in both cannabis research and treatment, with their scientists, clinicians, medical institutes, and universities being open and supportive to discovering its benefits, applications, and potential treatments to its population.

Although this publication refers to Autism as a “disease”, which is absolutely inaccurate, you can read more about the study here: In pioneering study, Israeli researchers target autism with cannabis

Leave a Reply